A partnership between UW and WSU

Washington Center for Muscle Biology

research . training . discovery . treatment

Answerline

Ask the experts

Want more information on muscle diseases?  Curious about graduate school?  Interested in helping to develop better treatments for muscular dystrophy, heart failure, cancer cachexia and other muscle diseases?  The Washington Center for Muscle Biology (WCMB) scientists want to hear from you!

Click a tab to choose a topic and in the boxes below, add your name and e-mail address and type in your question or comment. You’ll receive an email reply shortly after (please allow extra time during holidays). Please note that AnswerLine cannot assist with emergencies or personal problems.

  1. Dr. Rodgers said on February 4, 2012:

    I apologize for the slow responses. We’re having some server difficulties that resulted in our staff not being prompted by your comments. However, it will soon be fixed and I thank you for your patience.

  2. maqui said on December 23, 2011:

    I have heard from people that antioxidants are not as well absorbed by the body as they are made out to be, but everything I read regarding the studies shows the benefits of antioxidants against disease. Which is more accurate.

    • Dr. Rodgers said on February 4, 2012:

      Not all antioxidants are the same. Some are readily absorbed and some aren’t. Furthermore, some are rapidly broken down by the body and cleared while others can be stored in fat. Regularly consuming foods high in antioxidants is well known to improve health and in some instances, to prevent the likelihood of some diseases from occurring. Antioxidant supplements, however, may not provide the same level of protection. You’re best bet is to consult your physician as she/he will be able to make an informed decision based on your past health history and on your current dietary and health needs.

  3. Steve Pidgeon said on December 5, 2011:

    Hi I have recently been diagnosed with inclsion body myopathy with associated pagets disease and frontotemperal dementia. i am showing the first signs of weakness in my right shoulder. what should i do at this stage of onset of the disease and will these therapies in time be effective to treat my disease.
    Thanks Steve

    • Dr. Rodgers said on February 4, 2012:

      My deepest sympathies Steve. Inclusion body myopathy (IBM) is one of 3 primary inflammatory myopathies. It usually isn’t responsive to traditional anti-inflammatory agents and it isn’t considered a fatal disease, but it can be debilitating over time and result in wheelchair confinement. You should be seeing a neurologist who can provide you with very detailed answers for all of your specific questions regarding prognosis and treatment. Unfortunately, the cell- and gene-therapeutics being developed by WCMB member scientists will not be of use for patients with IBM. Physical therapy, however, can be very beneficial so please consult your physician.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.


*

 

  1. Dr. Rodgers said on March 7, 2013:

    There are many genetic causes for heart failure and a good genetic counselor at any large medical center should be able to help you. Treatment options are largely influenced by how well a patient’s heart performs in clinical tests and assessments. Nevertheless, understanding the cause, even if it is indeed genetic, can help a cardiologist better manage your health.

    • Michael Rhodes said on March 7, 2013:

      Yes I would love to know for myself as it stands i dont have the way to have the test ran to tell me what has happened but i has a family history of heart problems on my fathers family my grandfather passed away at 49 from heart issues and my father as well has had heart problems and had to have a bypass.

  2. Michael Rhodes said on January 24, 2013:

    I was wondering if any of the test you done been used or could be used on humans to see if cardiomyopathy was Genetic or not? I am a 36 yr old guy with a ejection fraction of 20% and I have a icd

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.


*

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.


*

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.


*

 

Washington Center for Muscle Biology, ASLB 124, Department of Animal Sciences, Pullman WA 99164, 509-335-2991, Contact Us
Log in | Powered by WordPress
© 2017 Washington State University | Accessibility | Policies | Copyright